Copenhagen Fashion Week: Inside the world’s most sustainable fashion week – Vogue

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Street style during Copenhagen Fashion Week (Photo: IMaxTree)

New winds are blowing in the fashion market. They come from the Nordic countries, more specifically from Copenhagen Fashion Week, which took place between the 9th and 12th of August. To parade in the Danish week, brands must follow a strict code of sustainable conduct, consisting of 18 items. It is a checklist aligned with the best international practices and that has been influencing companies around the world to reduce the social and environmental impacts of their businesses.

One of the requirements is that brands must have at least half of their collection certified and made of sustainable materials (recycled, produced from dead stocks or with technological materials) and inform their customers about their sustainability strategies in the store or on the website. . They also need to offer repair services for parts that may be damaged, in addition to reselling and renting looks.

To parade, they also have to prove that the jobs they generate are safe, without child labor. Another focus of this checklist is to reduce stock leftovers, which requires a change in the production line, making it happen on demand.

Another non-mandatory point, but highly recommended by the organizers of Copenhagen Fashion Week, is that brands need to create an inclusive design for different bodies and contemplate this diversity in their castings. Animal skins, of course, are prohibited, as is the use of plastic packaging. All products must be packaged in recyclable or recycled materials and the carbon emitted by presentations must be offset.

Such requirements result in cool and unpretentious looks, which translate into finishes with a handcrafted look: appliqués, tie-dyes, fringes, dévorés, worn, shredded or thread-cut fabrics. Here is a selection of the most emblematic productions presented during the week.

 (Photo: IMaxTree)

Jade Cropper (Photo: IMaxTree)

 (Photo: IMaxTree)

Stine Goya (Photo: IMaxTree)

 (Photo: IMaxTree)

Jade Cropper (Photo: IMaxTree)

 (Photo: IMaxTree)

Henrik Vibskov (Photo: IMaxTree)

 (Photo: IMaxTree)

(Di)vision (Photo: IMaxTree)

Nordic fashion also brings the desire to use extra size, translating a bit the calm attitude of the Slavic people, who, reflected in the aesthetics, ask for comfortable pieces with a clean design. What may be happening to a new part of the world’s population. It is not for nothing that buyers of American and European department stores were now seen in Copenhagen.

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